First Line Fridays: Among the Crepe Myrtles (Mini-Interview & Giveaway!)

First Line Fridays on Hoarding Books

Happy Friday, reading friends! Today we have a first line, a mini-interview and a giveaway! High-fives all around 😀

Today’s first line is from

among the crepe myrtles

Among the Crepe Myrtles
by Kim Williams

1916
Commerce, Texas

“Two days ago he was a husband.”

Amazon | Goodreads

Intriguing first line! Makes me want to read more, how about you?

We’re also honored to have Kim Williams stopping by for a chat today. Please join us in welcoming her to Hoarding Books!

Hi Kim! We want to know… which books/authors do YOU hoard?

Kim: I am so glad I wasn’t limited to one author in this question! I read leadership, children’s ministry, spiritual growth, and parenting books for my ministry job. My shelves are filled at work. Personally speaking, I have been a book hoarder since childhood. I tried to purchase and read as many of the classics as I could as a teen, and later used those to start my personal library in my classroom when I taught school. My son, a lit and comp teacher, inherited my book hoarding gene. At this point in life, I read primarily Christian Fiction, especially Historical Christian Fiction. I especially enjoy Kristy Cambron, Kate Breslin, Cathy Golhke, Elizabeth Camden, and Sarah Sundin. I definitely hoard their books. Author LN Cronk, who writes in the YA genre and for whom I have beta read, encouraged me to put my own words onto paper. I hesitantly gave in to buying ebooks so that I could carry my hoard of books with me (current hoard is 273), but I love the feel of a book, so I end up purchasing many in paperback. I shamelessly read my favorite books many times over.

KW Shelfie 1   KW shelfie 2

Carrie: Let’s not talk about how many ebooks I’m hoarding on my Kindle…

Do you have a favorite reading spot?

Kim: The beach. Ha! Since I don’t live anywhere near a beach, my favorite spot is a cozy couch in my den overlooking my backyard.

Carrie: A fair substitute 🙂

Tell us a little bit about Among the Crepe Myrtles.

Kim: A few years back, my family had gathered to celebrate my parents’ fiftieth wedding anniversary. At dinner, my cousin began talking about letters she had found in her deceased mother’s things. These letters were written by my great grandfather to my great grandmother. I found them heart wrenching when I read them. They were letters of a husband begging to be forgiven by his wife and asking to be reunited with her and their child. The story of my great grandparents’ romance and tragedy remained locked in their generation. What I do know is that the forgiveness never took place. Among theCrepe Myrtles is a fiction story based on the emotions in the letters. The foundation of the story is the need most anyone can relate to — the need to forgive and to be forgiven. The story points to ultimate forgiveness through Christ. The setting is rural Texas during the mid 1900’s.

Carrie: Wow! What a moving story-behind-the-story!

What can you tell us about the next installment of the Letters to Layton series?

Kim: I am so excited about the next book in the series. The story picks up exactly where Among the Crepe Myrtles leaves off. Readers will further get to know the inner struggles of the characters as they continue to face what life gives them. I am very excited for readers to meet a new character who has grown to be one of my favorite people and has more to tell than I can fit into this installment. Hint. Hint.

Carrie: Ooooo sounds like a character to meet for sure!

What are you working on now?

Kim: I am currently in the re-write stage of my next installment. I am also doing research for the third book in the series. Its storyline hits close to home for me personally, delving into an issue many families face.

Carrie: Can’t wait to learn more!

About the Author

kim williamsA former school teacher, Kim Williams has spent the past twenty-five-plus years on staff at her local church. Kim has traveled in both the US and abroad conducting training in leadership and ministry to children. She had a desire to write for a long time; one day her story met her head on, and she got busy making words into sentences, sentences into paragraphs, and paragraphs into chapters.
She resides in the Atlanta metro area with her husband, whom she met the summer after fifth grade. They have two grown children who are educators and who have the best spouses a parent could hope for.

Website | Facebook | Twitter

What are you reading?  What is your first line today?
Open the book nearest you and post the first line in the comments below.

Giveaway

For a chance to win a copy of Among the Crepe Myrtles, click on the Rafflecopter link below (US addresses only for the giveaway)

A Rafflecopter Giveaway

Giveaway is open until 11:59PM on March 15, 2017

For the purposes of this giveaway, Reading Is My SuperPower’s giveaway policies apply.

Don’t forget to join the Linky below with the URL to your blog POST (not your blog), your name and your email (which will remain hidden). Then bounce around the Linky and see what everyone else is reading!

Remember! Next week (March 16) is our special St. Patrick’s Day edition of First Line Fridays!

 

Advertisements

29 thoughts on “First Line Fridays: Among the Crepe Myrtles (Mini-Interview & Giveaway!)

  1. Sounds like an interesting read!

    I’m featuring the long-awaited conclusion to Ronie Kendig’s fantasy series this week: Fierian. However here, I’ll share the first line from Tammy L. Gray’s new release, Until I Knew Myself:

    “Even after his mom passed away, Tyler refused to call himself an orphan.”

    Have a great weekend! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Okay, I want to know what happened between two days ago and now! Sounds like a book that will be added to my TBR pile.

    I’m sharing Emily Conrad’s release of Justice today.
    “Snow floated onto Main Street, each flake large enough to catch the breeze like a parachute.”

    Happy Friday!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. This sounds like a book I’d enjoy reading. I’m going to add it to my #TBR!
    Over on my blog I’m sharing the first line from Michelle Greip’s latest book, The Innkeeper’s Daughter. You’ll have to stop by and check out the first line, and then be sure to let me know if you are a fan of numbers. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Sounds like an incredible series! Thanks for sharing!

    Father Brian Flynn, the curate at St. Augustine’s, Rossmore, hated the Feast Day of St. Ann with a passion that was unusual for a Catholic priest. – Whitethorn Woods by Maeve Binchy

    Happy Friday! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Sounds awesome! I’m putting this on my TBR wish list. Here’s my first line from Kelly Irwin’s “Beneath the Summer Sun.”: “The smack of the baseball against an aluminum bat sounded like summer.”

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Happy Friday! I always love seeing what everyone is reading when I get to stop by! My first line is from A Refuge Assured by Jocelyn Green:

    “Propping open the door to her shop, Vivienne Rivard listened to a distant rumble that vibrated the windows and shivered in her chest.”

    Liked by 1 person

  7. That’s a powerful first line. I will have to check this book out.

    Happy Friday!

    Over on my blog today, I am sharing the first line from Kristi Ann Hunter’s new novella, A Search for Refuge. I’m just on chapter two, so I will share the first line from that chapter here:

    “Nash slid the tin of peppermints into his coat pocket and reached beneath the counter to pull out Mrs. Lancaster’s log book.”

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Definitely an interesting first line that begs answers to questions running through the readers mind. On my blog, I’m featuring The Healer by Beverly Joy Roberts. It’s an amazing fiction that moved me deeply. I hope you will take the time to check it out. Here, I will share the first line from a book by C.H. Spurgeon that I’m currently reading. “‘Thou has visited me in the night.’ –Psalm 18:3. ‘Tis a theme for wonder that the glorious God should visit sinful man.” Wishing you a blessed weekend.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. My first line is from A Most Noble Heir by Susan Anne Mason:
    Derbyshire, England
    March, 1884
    Nolan Price scanned the fields of newly budding greenery that stretched as far as he could see and slowly inhaled the scent of grass, soil, and freshly spread manure.

    Like

  10. This is so interesting! Writing a book based on letters someone in your family found years before! Happy Friday! My lines are: “Face it Eric. You’re a f@ckboy”. I turned away from the shapely a@ss I’d been checking out, and frowned”.
    These lines come from an ARC of Chaser by Kylie Scott and it’s sweet, fun and nostalgic so far.

    Like

  11. Oh man. I love old letters! That would be such an exciting discovery, notwithstanding the tragic story behind them. It is interesting that she must have kept the letters even though she didn’t forgive him.
    Over on my blog, I am sharing the first line from Michelle Griep’s The Innkeeper’s Daughter which I will review soon.
    Here, I will share one of my favorite lines from that book:
    “It might’ve been a cozy inn at some point, but now the walls leaned in toward the soot-blackened ceiling, giving the impression the entire building wanted to lie down and rest.”

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Thanks for the interview with Kim Williams. Always love learning more about the authors. Would love the chance to read “Among the Crepe Myrtles”.

    First line –
    Ada Rupp balanced on her chair and reached overhead to finish stapling the row of alphabet letters across the front of the classroom.
    THE AMISH TEACHER’S GIFT
    By Rachel J. Good

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.